IOC disqualifies hurdler Almouhamad

IOC disqualifies hurdler Almouhamad

London – GBR, August 11, 2012: The International Olympic Committee (IOC) today announced that it has disqualified Syrian athlete Ghfran Almouhamad from the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London for an anti-doping rule violation. Almouhamad, 23, provided a urine sample on 3 August 2012 in London that indicated the presence of methylhexaneamine. The analysis of the B sample confirmed the results of the A sample. The athlete competed in the women’s 400m hurdles event on 5 August and placed eighth in the second heat of the first round.

The IOC Disciplinary Commission, composed for this case of Thomas Bach (Chairman), Denis Oswald and Frank Fredericks, decided:

I. The Athlete, Ms Ghfran Almouhamad, Syrian Arab Republic, Athletics:

(i) is disqualified from the women’s 400m hurdles event of the 2012 London Olympic Games where she placed 8th in the 2nd heat of the 1st round; and

(ii) shall have her Olympic identity and accreditation card cancelled and withdrawn immediately.

II. The International Association of Athletics Federations is requested to modify the results of the above-mentioned event accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.

III. The Syrian Olympic Committee shall ensure full implementation of this decision.

IV. This decision shall enter into force immediately.

Read the full decision here:

INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE IOC DISCIPLINARY COMMISSION DECISION REGARDING MS. GHFRAN ALMOUHAMAD BORN ON 6 JUNE 1989, ATHLETE, SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC, ATHLETICS

1. Ms. Ghfran Almouhamad (hereafter the “Athlete”) was requested on 3 August 2012, in London, at approximately 11:30 a.m. to provide a urine sample for a pre-competition doping control.

2. On 5 August 2012, the Athlete competed in the women’s 400m hurdles event at the occasion of the London 2012 Olympic Games (hereafter the “London Olympic Games”), where she placed 8th in the 2nd heat of the 1st round.

3. Pursuant to Article 6.2.1 of the IOC Anti-Doping Rules Applicable to the Games of the XXX Olympiad, London 2012 (the “Rules”), Dr. Patrick Schamasch (the “IOC Medical Director”), as representative of the Chairman of the IOC Medical Commission, was informed at approximately 12:10 p.m. on Tuesday, 7 August 2012 by the Head of the WADA Accredited Laboratory in Harlow, of an adverse analytical finding on the A sample of the above-noted urine.

4. Pursuant to Article 6.2.2 of the Rules, the IOC Medical Director determined that the above noted A sample belonged to the Athlete, and verified that it did in fact give rise to an adverse analytical finding. He also determined that there was no apparent departure from the International Standards for Testing or the International Standards for Laboratories that undermined the validity of the adverse analytical finding.

5. Pursuant to Article 6.2.3 of the Rules, the IOC Medical Director immediately informed the IOC President, Dr Jacques Rogge, of the existence of the adverse analytical finding and the essential details available to him concerning the case.

6. Pursuant to Article 6.2.5 of the Rules, the IOC President, by letter dated 9 August 2012, promptly set up a Disciplinary Commission, consisting of:

– Thomas Bach (Chairman)

– Denis Oswald

– Frank Fredericks

The IOC President also informed the Disciplinary Commission that, pursuant to Rule 59.2.4 of the Olympic Charter and Article 6.1.6. of the Rules, the decision of the Disciplinary Commission in this case would constitute the decision of the IOC. The IOC President has in this case decided that the procedure may be extended beyond the 24-hour time-limit as per Article 6.2.14 of the Rules.

7. The analytical report of the laboratory analysis of the A urine sample, issued by the WADA Accredited Laboratory in Harlow, dated 7 August 2012, indicated the presence of methylhexaneamine.

8. Pursuant to Article 6.2.6 of the Rules, by letter dated 9 August 2012, notified to the Athlete, to the Chef de Mission of the Syrian Olympic Committee (hereafter the “SOC”), Dr. Maher Khayyatta, to the International Association of Athletics Federations (hereafter the “IAAF”) and to the Head of the Independent Observers’ Programme, the IOC President advised of the above-mentioned adverse analytical finding and of the time, date and place of the hearing of the Disciplinary Commission regarding this case.

9. The Athlete requested the analysis of the B sample, which occurred on Friday 10 August 2012, at approximately 10:00 a.m. (UK time), at the WADA Accredited Laboratory in Harlow, in the presence of the Athlete’s representative, Mr. Mohamed Kamel Shbib.

10. On the morning of 10 August 2012, the IOC received a written statement from the SOC indicating that it was sorry and disappointed to learn about the Athlete’s adverse analytical finding given its frequent warnings to all athletes in their delegation not to take medication without first informing the SOC. The SOC further indicated that it would accept the decision of the Disciplinary Commission without the need to have a hearing if the result of the B sample confirmed the result of the adverse analytical finding of the A sample.

11. Shortly after receiving the SOC’s written statement, the IOC informed the SOC that the results of the B sample would not be known until the morning of 11 August 2012, and that the hearing would take place as scheduled at 4:00 p.m. on 10 August 2012.

12. In response, the SOC indicated in another written statement that the Athlete and the SOC waived their right to attend the hearing. As a result, the Disciplinary Commission did not hold a hearing in this case.

13. The IAAF took note that there would be no hearing and declared that it would not make a submission.

14. The Head of the Independent Observer Program acknowledged that there would be no hearing.

15. On 11 August 2012, the Disciplinary Commission received the analytical report of the laboratory analysis of the Athlete’s B urine sample, issued by the WADA Accredited Laboratory in Harlow, dated 11 August 2012, confirming the result of the adverse analytical finding of the A sample by indicating the presence of methylhexaneamine.

16. After reviewing the file, including the above-noted written statements from the SOC, the Disciplinary Commission unanimously concluded that the Athlete had committed an antidoping rule violation pursuant to Article 2.1 of the World Anti-Doping Code and Articles 2 and 12 of the Rules in that there was the presence of the prohibited substance, methylhexaneamine in her body.

17. In view of the above, and pursuant to Article 7.1 of the Rules, the Disciplinary Commission decided that the Athlete is disqualified from the women’s 400m hurdles event in which she participated at the London Olympic Games.

CONSIDERING the above, pursuant to the Olympic Charter and, in particular, Rule 59.2.1 thereof, and pursuant to the IOC Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the Games of the XXX Olympiad, London 2012 and in particular, Articles 1.2, 2 and 7 thereof and pursuant to the World Anti-Doping Code and, in particular, Articles 2.1 and 10 thereof:

THE DISCIPLINARY COMMISSION OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE DECIDES

I. The Athlete, Ms. Ghfran Almouhamad, Syrian Arab Republic, Athletics:

(i) is disqualified from the women’s 400m hurdles event of the 2012 London Olympic Games where she placed 8th in the 2nd heat of the 1st round; and

(ii) shall have her Olympic identity and accreditation card cancelled and withdrawn immediately.

II. The International Association of Athletics Federations is requested to modify the results of the above-mentioned event accordingly and to consider any further action within its own competence.

III. The Syrian Olympic Committee shall ensure full implementation of this decision.

IV. This decision shall enter into force immediately.

London, 11 August 2012

The IOC Disciplinary Commission:

Thomas BACH Chairman & Denis Oswald Frank Fredericks

Under the IOC Anti-Doping Rules applicable to the 2012 London Olympic Games, testing takes place under the IOC’s auspices from 16 July (date of the opening of the Olympic Village) to 12 August 2012. Within that period, the IOC systematically performs tests before and after events. After each event, the IOC systematically carries out tests on the top five finishers plus two at random. The IOC also performs out-of-competition unannounced tests. Over the course of the London Games, the IOC is expected to carry out some 5,000 tests – 3,800 urine and 1,200 blood. For more information, please consult the IOC factsheet on anti-doping. —- IOC/Image © au.eurosport.com

 

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