Japan edge out Brazil in thriller

The 2013 World Championships gripped Rio de Janeiro one last time as the team’s competition brought the judo extravaganza to a close at the Maracanazinho on Sunday. Teams of five judoka saw action with 16 men’s teams and 16 women’s teams competing for world team honours.

The 2012 World Team Championships were held in Salvador, Brazil as the leading judoka represented their country in the nation of judo lovers. Russia won the men’s title in 2012 against Japan who claimed the women’s title against China and all three countries were back in Brazil to bid for medal honours in Rio on Sunday.

Ahead of the final block there was a passing of the IJF flag as Paulo WANDERLEY, Brazilian Judo Confederation President, returned the flag to VIZER, IJF President, who in turn passed it to Denis LAPOTYSHKIN, Vice President of Chelyabinsk Judo Federation, with the Russian city set to stage the 2014 World Championships.

Vizer said: “Dear guests and judoka, I want to congratulate the Brazilian Judo Confederation for a successful event and the spectators for their attendance and support. I wish you a successful finals and thank you for hosting this event. I would like to give a special welcome to the Rio 2016 Coordination Commission, it’s a big honour for us to have you here. I’d like to congratulate once again the new members of IJF Athlete Commission and I wish them a successful collaboration.”

There was also a special visit from Dr. Carlos Arthur NUZMAN, President of Rio 2016 and the IOC Coordination Commission to watch the final block.

Dr. Carlos Arthur Nuzman said: “I am very pleased and happy with what I saw today here in Rio on the occasion of this World Championship by teams. It was a great competition, with fantastic champions and very well organised. Judo is important, very well established in Brazil and in the world, it is big and judo is growing very fast under the leadership of IJF President, Marius Vizer. This is important.”

WOMEN TEAM’S

Japan edge out Brazil in thriller

Japan’s women were unable to win gold in individual action but their talented ranks teamed up today to great effect as they edged out hosts Brazil in a thrilling final. 2012 World team bronze medallists Brazil lined up opposite defending champions Japan with the teeming venue spurring on the hosts as they shared every emotion of their judoka.

HASHIMOTO Yuki (JPN) conquered Erika MIRANDA (BRA) with a yoko-shiho-gatame for ippon before newly-crowned world champion Rafael SILVA (BRA) fired back with a rousing triumph against YAMAMOTO Anzu (JPN) with a yuko from an osoto-otoshi proving decisive. Katherine CAMPOS (BRA) suffered an agonising defeat against ABE Kana (JPN) as she was held down in front of her home fans and teammates with a mune-gatame to restore Japan’s lead. Maria PORTELA ensured the match would go down to the final fight as she bested TACHIMOTO Haruka (JPN) on shido penalties with two against the Japanese judoka and only one against the Brazilian. The gold medal was decided when 2013 World Championship silver medallist Maria Suelen ALTHEMAN (BRA) was frustrated by TACHIMOTO Megumi (JPN) as she was penalised with a shido for passivity which separated the two judoka after five minutes.

In the semi-final stage Japan were unmatched as they whitewashed a high-quality Netherlands team 5-0 while Brazil did it the hard way as their fate was not decided until the fifth contest during an epic showdown against South Korea with 2013 World Championship bronze medallist wrapping up a 3-2 win against LEE (KOR). In the quarter-final Japan strolled past Kazahkstan 5-0 while Brazil left it until the final contest as Maria Suelen ALTHEMAN defeated European champion Lucie LOUETTE (FRA) to seal a 3-2 win.

The first team bronze medal was won by Cuba who repeated their 2012 result with a fine triumph against Korea as newly-crowned 2013 World Championship winner Idalys ORTIZ (CUB) settled the match with a 3-2 scoreline. The second team bronze medal was won by France who showed their class with a defiant comeback having trailed 2-0. LOUETTE was the French hero as she scored almost at will against LEMMEN (NED) with a yuko from an ouchi-gari penetrating the scoreboard along with a second yuko and a waza-ari to clinch a remarkable comeback.

Final Results: 1. JAPAN (JPN). 2. BRAZIL (BRA). 3. CUBA (CUB). 3. FRANCE (FRA). 5. KOREA (KOR). 5. NETHERLAND (NED). 7. KAZAKHSTAN (KAZ). 7. CHINA (CHN).

MEN TEAM’S: Golden Georgia narrowly defeat reigning champions Russia

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Georgia’s star-laden team overcome defending champions Russia in a nail-biting gold medal match. Former European champion Alim GADANOV (RUS) put Russia ahead with a win against Olympic champion Lasha SHAVDATUASHVILI (GEO). After both men received shido penalties for not taking a grip, GADANOV stepped up his work rate and was duly rewarded as he lifted SHAVDATUASHVILI for an ura-ange for a yuko score which steered him to a 1-0 victory. Zebeda REKHVIASHVILI (GEO) went down to a defeat against Murat KODZOKOV (RUS) as Russia doubled their lead. With a minute and a half remaining KODZOKOV attacked with uchi-mata which produced ippon.

Georgia fought back as European silver medallist Avtandili TCHRIKISHVILI (GEO) saw off Sirazhudin MAGOMEDOV (RUS) on shido penalties as the latter was penalised on two occasions for passivity while TCHRIKISHVILI infringed on one occasion for the same offence. With Georgia back in the match, they grew in confidence and Varlam LIPARTELIANI (GEO) put them back on level terms as Kirill DENISOV (RUS) was penalised twice compared to the one infringement from the Georgian as the momentum firmly swung in their favour. A stunning comeback was complete when Adam OKRUASHVILI (GEO) defeated 34-year-old Alexander MIKHAYLIN by ippon to capture the gold medal.

In the semi-final Russia, who eased past Colombia and Cuba without losing a single contest, inflicted a landslide defeat on Cuba as their impressive run continued. GADANOV (RUS) put the defending champions ahead with victory against Olympic bronze medallist CHO Jun-Ho (KOR). Moscow Grand Slam silver medallist Denis IARTCEV (RUS) doubled their advantage before World Judo Masters winner and Olympic bronze medallist Ivan NIFONTOV (RUS) sealed a place in the final at the expense of HONG Suk Woong (KOR). 2013 World Championship bronze medallist Kirill DENISOV (RUS) bested GWAK Dong Han (KOR) before Olympic bronze medallist Alexander MIKHAYLIN (RUS) suffered Russia’s first defeat against CHO Guham (KOR) as a consolation for the well beaten South Korean team.

At the same stage Georgia won by the same margin against Uzbekistan. Olympic bronze medallist and two-time world champion Rishod SOBIROV (UZB), who was elected to the IJF Athletes Commission today, put Uzbekistan in front as he defeated Olympic champion Lasha SHAVDATUASHVILI (GEO). Nugzari TATALASHVILI (GEO) restored parity as he humbled Mirali SHARIPOV (UZB) before 2013 World Championship silver medallist Avtandili TCHRIKISHVILI (GEO) edged the Georgian team ahead. Georgia’s second 2013 World Championship silver medallist Varlam LIPARTELIANI (GEO) steered his team through with their third win before Adam OKRUASHVILI (GEO) registered win number four.

In the quarter-final Russia shut out Cuba 5-0 in the quarter-final while Georgia, who opened their campaign with a 3-2 victory over France, defeated Mongolia 4-1.

The first team bronze medals were won by Germany who secured a 3-2 record against Uzbekistan. Former world champion Rishod SOBIROV (UZB) gave Uzbekistan the lead before the German team came storming back with wins from standouts such as Igor WANDTKE (GER). The second team bronze medals were won by Japan (JPN) who produced a comprehensive 4-1 victory against South Korea (KOR). FUKUOKA Masaaki (JPN) gave Japan the initiative before world champion ONO Shohei extended their lead. There was no comeback from Korea who had to settle for fifth-place.

Final Results: 1. GEORGIA (GEO). 2. RUSSIA (RUS). 3. JAPAN (JPN). 3. GERMANY (GER). 5. KOREA (KOR). 5. UZBEKISTAN (UZB). 7. CUBA (CUB). 7. MONGOLIA (MGL)

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